Kom Ombo Temple And Luxor Attractions – Egytipstravel

Kom Ombo Temple

Kom Ombo Temple And Luxor Attractions

If you approach from the river, the soaring columns of the Great Temple of Kom Ombo rising dramatically above the Nile’s bank are one of Egypt’s iconic views.

Today Kom Ombo (47 kilometers north of Aswan and 168 kilometers south of Luxor) may be a sleepy agricultural backwater surrounded by sugar cane fields, but this temple dedicated to the gods Sobek and Haroeris is a reminder of this area’s importance in Ancient Egypt due to its prime position along the Nile.

Stroll through the temple’s colonnades, gazing up at scenes of pharaonic propaganda, and you’ll capture the ambience of this

Kom Ombo Temple

glorious history for yourself.

Pylon:Kom Ombo’s Regal Entrance

Kom Ombo’s Pylon originally had two gateways, but the left-hand half has completely disappeared, and only the lower parts of the central pillar and the right wing survive.

As you enter, look to the right-hand front 

wall to see (from left to right) the gods Sobek, Hathor, and Khons; a hieroglyphic text of 52 lines; and a relief of the Roman Emperor Domitian wearing the crowns of Upper Egypt.

Forecourt: The Courtyard of Sobek and Haroeris

Just as at Edfu’s Temple of Horus, the

Kom Ombo Temple

Forecourt here was originally surrounded on three sides by colonnades, but only the lower halves of the 16 columns remain today. The reliefs here – depicting Tiberius making offerings – are remarkable for the freshness of their coloring. In the center of the courtyard is a square altar base, while along the far side are stone screens.

Dont Miss: The reliefs on the right-hand stone screen depict falcon-headed Horus and ibis-headed Thoth pouring consecration water over Neos Dionysos (Ptolemy XII), with crocodile-headed Sobek standing to the left.

On the left-hand screen, the same scene is depicted, but Sobek is swapped for Haroeris.

Vestibule: Entering the Inner Templekom ombo temple

The Vestibule’s 10 columns are gorgeously decorated with rich palm capitals, while both the walls and columns are embellished with reliefs.

Check out the ceiling over the main two aisles, with its paintings of flying vultures.

Don’t Miss: The mural reliefs in the Vestibule are particularly fine.

Look for the mural left of the north doorway, which depicts Neos Dionysos in the presence of Haroeris being blessed by a lion-headed Isis.

Hypostyle Hall

Two doorways lead you from the Vestibule into the Hypostyle Hall with its roof supported by 10 papyrus columns boasting floral capitals.Kom Ombo temple

On the column shafts, Euergetes is depicted making offerings to various gods, while the reliefs on the walls show him in converse with the gods. Between the doors from the vestibule is the sacred crocodile of Ombos.

Between the doors leading into the rear part of the temple are reliefs of Euergetes II’s elder brother, Philometor, making an offering to the falcon-headed Haroeris.

Don’t Miss: The loveliest relief here is found on the left-hand (northern) wall. Here, you can see the falcon-headed Haroeris presenting the Ptolemaic era pharaoh with the curved sword of victory and the hieroglyph for eternal life. Just behind the pharaoh are his sister Cleopatra VII and his wife Cleopatra.

Antechambers

Three Antechambers lead off from the Hypostyle Hall, gradually leading you into the inner temple area.kom ombo

All the walls here are covered with fine reliefs. As you walk through, notice how each antechamber is slightly higher than the one before.

The small rooms on the left-hand side of the Antechambers would have once served as temple store rooms.

Don’t Miss: On the rear wall of the third antechamber, look between the two doors to see a fine relief of Philometor in a long white mantle, with Cleopatra behind him, standing before the falcon-headed moon god Khons, who is writing the pharaoh’s name on a palm branch with the symbol for a long reign.

To the rear are the principal gods of Ombos, Haroeris, and Sobek.

Three Antechambers lead off from the Hypostyle Hall, gradually leading you into the inner temple area. All the walls here are covered with fine reliefs. As you walk through, notice how each antechamber is slightly higher than the one before. The small rooms on the left-hand side of the Antechambers would have once served as temple store rooms.

Don’t Miss: On the rear wall of the third antechamber, look between the two doors to see a fine relief of Philometor in a long white mantle, with Cleopatra behind him, standing before the falcon-headed moon god Khons, who is writing the pharaoh’s name on a palm branch with the symbol for a long reign. To the rear are the principal gods of Ombos, Haroeris, and Sobek.

Sanctuary: The Domain of Sobek and Haroeris

Enter through the two doors in the rear wall of the third antechamber to arrive in the temple’s sanctuary area, split into two here to worship both Haroeris (to the left) and Sobek (to the right). The black granite base in each sanctuary was for the sacred barque, which would have held the image of the god. Around the chapels were a number of smaller rooms with crypts.

Inner Passageway

If you walk back to the Vestibule, you can enter the temple’s Inner Passageway. At the far end are seven small chambers with unfinished reliefs, which show different stages of the artist’s work and several inscriptions that were sketched out but never completed.

Outer Passageway

The east walls of the outer passage around the temple are covered with reliefs depicting the Roman Emperor Trajan making offerings to Egyptian gods. At the northeast corner, he is shown kneeling before two deities; beside this scene is a set of medical instruments.

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